Professor Bassam Bamieh (University of California at Santa Barbara) visits our group.

Professor Bassam Bamieh (University of California at Santa Barbara) visits our group.

4/9/2018
EMAN group is very happy to welcome Prof. Bassam Bamieh. Dr Bamieh is Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Associate Director of the Center for Control, Dynamical Systems and Computation (CCDC) at at the University of California at Santa Barbara. His research interests are in the fundamentals of Control and Dynamical Systems such as Robust, Optimal and Distributed Control, as well as the applications of systems and feedback techniques in several physical and engineering systems including shear flow transition and turbulence, and the use of feedback in thermoacoustic energy conversion devices. He is a past recipient of the AACC Hugo Schuck Best Paper Award, and the IEEE Control Systems Society G. S. Axelby Outstanding Paper Award (twice). He is a Fellow of the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC) , and a Fellow of the IEEE.​​
Professor Bassam will give a talk next Wednesday 11th Apr 2018 about: 

Dynamical systems subject to both additive and multiplicative time-varying noise exhibit varied and rich phenomenology. We study such systems in a framework similar to that used in robust control where stochastic parameters are viewed as a "structured uncertainty". In particular, a purely input-output approach is developed to characterize mean-square stability. Applications of this framework to large-scale, networked dynamical systems with link failures and stochastic topologies will be illustrated. Specifically we show how vehicle formations on a highway that emulate a virtually rigid train are impossible in the large limit size. In addition, we exhibit a stochastic model of the mammalian Cochlea explains otoacoustic emissions as an instability mechanism. Finally, we illustrate some interesting connections of this work with the phenomenon of Anderson Localization which is a canonical problem in the statistical physics of disordered media. A theme emerges that while a variety of network topologies can produce similar collective phenomena, unexpected fragilities can arise due to a combination of local node dynamics and network topology.​